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c0ssette:

Angel of Death,detail,Emile Jean Horace Vernet.

c0ssette:

Angel of Death,detail,Emile Jean Horace Vernet.

(via vintagegal)

— 11 hours ago with 8359 notes

The Sonata, 1889 | Irving Ramsey Wiles

The Sonata, 1889 | Irving Ramsey Wiles

(Source: lindsaylannisters)

— 1 day ago with 39 notes
Fragments of Beauty: Sculptural Details

stlukesguild:

I believe it was either André Malraux or Sir Kenneth Clark who spoke of the wealth of nude sculpture in the West… especially that of the 18th and 19th centuries… as one vast waste of entire acres of Carrara marble. Having more recently given a second look at a good deal of such sculpture I am struck by the exquisite details captured in many of these works… details often best conveyed though photography:

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— 1 day ago with 8 notes

fuckyeahmsp:

Unheard 50 minute interview of James Dean Bradfield in America, shortly after Richey’s disappearance & before his missing status was made public. Thanks to Thomas Gorman for the recording (found on a CD at a record fair).

Many thanks to manicstmania for tweeting it & Thomas for finding it.

— 4 days ago with 37 notes
isociuil:

William Adolphe Bouguereau (William Bouguereau) (1825-1905)
Nymphes et Satyre
Oil on canvas
1873
260 x 180 cm

isociuil:

William Adolphe Bouguereau (William Bouguereau) (1825-1905)

Nymphes et Satyre

Oil on canvas

1873

260 x 180 cm

— 5 days ago with 11 notes

neonaos:

Jacques-Louis David, The Oath of the Horatii (detail),1784

— 6 days ago with 17 notes
detailsofpaintings:

Anne Vallayer-Coster, Nature Morte au Vase de Fleurs, Nid d’Oiseau et Bourse
1780-81

detailsofpaintings:

Anne Vallayer-Coster, Nature Morte au Vase de Fleurs, Nid d’Oiseau et Bourse

1780-81

(via vintagegal)

— 6 days ago with 5485 notes

blondeapocalypse:

Woke up with a bit of a hangover

— 2 weeks ago with 54 notes

themastersbeard:

Vera Brittain (29 December 1893 - 29 March 1970)

Born in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Vera Brittain spent her childhood with her younger brother Edward in Buxton. In 1914, as she was preparing to commence her studies at Somerville College, University of Oxford, the First World War broke out. She watched as her brother and their closest friends, Victor Richardson and Roland Leighton enlisted in succession. She was later engaged to Roland, and in 1915 she chose to halt her studies in order to take up a position as a Voluntary Aid Detachment (V.A.D) nurse.

On December 23rd 1915, Roland was shot and killed. Vera was informed of his death while waiting for him to arrive home on leave. Devastated, she traveled to Malta the following year to serve as a nurse at St. George’s hospital.

On the 9th of April, 1917, Victor was shot in the head and blinded during the Battle of Arras,and on the 23rd of April, a close friend of her and her brother, Geoffrey Thurlow, was killed in action at Monchy-le-Preux. She traveled back to England at the end of May, intending to propose a marriage of convenience to Victor, however, his condition worsened, and after a descent into delirium, he died on the 9th of June.

In January 1918 she saw Edward for the last time before his death on the 15th of June during an assault on the Asiago Plateau. He was the last of her friends. She wrote: “I decided in the first few weeks after his loss that nothing would ever really console me for Edward’s death or make his memory less poignant and in this I was quite correct, for nothing ever has.”

After the war she returned to Oxford and it was there that she met Winifred Holtby, a fellow aspiring novelist. She was to become her closest friend until Winifred’s death in 1935. Vera married political scientist George Catlin in 1925, but chose not to take his name. On their wedding day, she carried pink roses down the aisle in commemoration of those once given to her by Roland. They had two children, John Edward, and Shirley, who later served as a Member of Parliament, and is now the Baroness of Crosby.

In the post-war years, Vera became a dedicated feminist, socialist, and pacifist activist. During the Second World War, her named was among those found in The Black Book which detailed the individuals who were to be immediately arrested following a Nazi takeover of Great Britain. Her memoir, and the most famous of her published works, ‘Testament of Youth’ recounted her experiences during the Great War was published in 1933. She died on the 29th of March, 1970, and, at her request, her ashes were scattered over her brother’s grave on the Asiago Plateau.

(Source: oucs.ox.ac.uk)

— 1 month ago with 14 notes